Archive for the ‘promotion’ Category

Press Release Tools

June 13, 2007

Many writers have never written a press release. They figure that’s something their book publisher handles or something they can delegate to someone else. In the normal course of events, your book publisher will prepare a press release for the book. This release is focused on the content of your book and a mixture of information about you as the author and the unique marketing position of your new book. It’s a one time event then the publicity person moves on to another book.

There are almost limitless opportunities to promote your events, your forthcoming workshops, your new products and other aspects of your work–if you know how to write an effective press release. It’s another critical skill that every writer should add to their base of knowledge. The first part of this process is learning to write the release, then you need to effectively get that release to the right media person (newspaper, magazine, Internet, radio or television) and follow-up. The key will almost always be in the follow-up.

Whether you’ve never written a press release or it’s been a long time or you just want a tool to help you in this process, I’ve found this resource from John Jantsch at Duct Tape Marketing. It’s an online press release generator. You fill in the blanks and it generates a press release which you can receive via email and send out. You have to subscribe and confirm your subscription to reach the Instant Press Release link but then you can save this link in your browser and use it over and over. John is using this tool as another way to build subscribers and it’s admirable. If you don’t want to be on his list, you can unsubscribe at any time but I see he provides continual value to his audience and recommend you stay with his list.

Another resource in this same area (where you don’t have to register for the tool) is the Press Release Builder. If you follow the various links here, you will gain an education in this aspect of the business, learn how to email reporters and much more.

A few readers are probably grousing about this post and wondering why they should even care. They want to get published in magazines. Or they have a novel that they want to get published. Or they have a nonfiction idea that they are putting together into a book. Here’s why you should care: you are the best person to promote yourself. Unless you write certain press releases and send them into the market and follow-up with the media, they will never be written. Yes, you can hire a publicist to write them for you but if your resources are limited, then you should broaden your skills and learn to write press releases.

The Tricky Balance

March 21, 2007

With increasing frequency I hear this little statement, “Talking about writing is much more fun than actually writing.” It’s true in some respects. Carefully crafting words on paper is hard work. It’s disciplined work and something you have to focus on and make happen. I know these elements firsthand because of the writing deadlines I’m facing–doing and completing all the time. For example, in the last week, I’ve completed a new Ebook which you will be hearing about in the coming days (now in the production process).

Often the first step for many writers is to learn the craft of writing and regularly practice their craft through magazine articles, articles for websites, book proposals and books. It’s one part of the process. Also I listen as some writers ignore another key part of the process–the personal marketing, platform building and promotion. Call it what you want but there is also a necessity to devote a certain level of energy toward this process. You can’t delegate this process to your book publisher or you will likely be disappointed with the results. This result is particularly true if you are a beginning writer and new in the process or in the middle-selling part of the pack.

Today I read a fascinating article from Marisa D’Vari who is one of my colleagues in the American Society of Journalists and Authors. We’ve met at our conferences. In the January/ February issue of Pages, D’Vari wrote “Platform Shoe-Ins, How Does Savvy Marketing Build A Bestseller?” This article isn’t available online–and I just found the reason (Pages is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy). Here’s a couple of relevant paragraphs to this discussion from D’Vari, “Victoria Moran, author of the bestselling Creating a Charmed Life: Sensible, Spiritual Secrets Every Busy Woman Should Know, takes a spiritual view of what it takes to create a bestseller, despite the fact she spends several hours a day building buzz for her books and hosts a radio show on Sirius Satellite Radio’s Martha Stewart Living channel. “I do the footwork–the website, the online newsletter, working with speakers’ bureaus–yet what has really made magic for me is just showing up,” she says. “By believing in my message and that there’s a place for it in this world, great stuff has just come to me.”

“Media attention can create awareness of the author’s name, but what makes a bestseller is the right book at the right time with the right buzz. A large promotional budget can help launch a book, but it’s self-defeating for a shy author to appear on Good Morning America or embark on a book tour. Making a personal connection with readers can go a long way to building a readership, but in the end, Moran may be right–all an author can really do is believe in her message, promote the book as well as she can, and leave the rest to the universe.”

Notice the huge “footwork” Moran is doing to get out in front of the public. Also the way she believes in her message then is waiting for the right book at the right time. It’s a tricky balance.